Voter Suppression


Voting is something that for some comes very easily, while for others it can be very challenging, even when you would truly like to participate. The groups most affected by voter suppression include; BIPOC, students (that are 18, of course), elderly and people with disabilities. It is important to address the disparity so that it may become convenient for all, every vote matters. There are 4 main ways voter suppression shows itself;

1. Voter ID Laws

2. Voter Registration Restrictions

3.Voter Purges

4.Felony Disenfranchisment

According to the U.S Government Accountability Office, voter ID laws reduce voter turnout by approximately 2-3 percentage points, translating to tens of thousands of votes lost in only one state. While many of these methods affect people of all backgrounds, Black Americans are disproportionately affected. For example, in Georgia, 70% of the voters purged in 2018 were Black. Feloy disenfranchisement leave 1 in 13 Black Americans unable to vote. This pose the question, if you commit a felon, does this make you unable to choose a quality candidate for you and your community? This is also not done by accident. It began during the Jim Crow era, right after Black American fought for the right to vote. Legislatures began imposing literacy tests, while many Black American were gravely affected by slavery, in which learning how to read was prohibited. Along with polling taxes, knowing many newly free Black individuals lived in poverty with no help from he US government. Voting is a right that for some was given but for others, it was fought for. Ensuring that our civic duty is not made to be a chore benefits us all, in fact, it is necessary in order to have a sustainable and equitable future.


sources: https://www.aclu.org/news/civil-liberties/block-the-vote-voter-suppression-in-2020/

https://www.npr.org/2018/10/23/659784277/republican-voter-suppression-efforts-are-targeting-minorities-journalist-says



5 views

Site Language

© 2020 by Constellation.